Tweedy, O'Rourke, Kotche project ready for release.

This is the place where you can vent whatever's on your mind. Feel free to go off on extended rants or brief blurbs about whatever's rocking your world.

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clem

Postby clem » Fri Dec 13, 2002 7:17 am

If Tweedy didn't do side projects like Loose Fur then it's likely that he'd push Wilco into that direction even more than he has. The people who wish for more traditional Wilco should probably be the ones celebrating him doing this sort of thing the most (and staying away from shows where he's operating outside the context of Wilco).

The thing about alt-country is Jeff started doing it, what, 13-14 years ago? Are you still doing what you did from that long ago? Do the same things hold your interest? Probably not. I know I'm burned out on it and I didn't really pay attention to it until I heard Trace in 1996. The artists from it's heyday are either broken up (Son Volt, Blue Mountain, Whiskeytown, et al) or trying as hard as they can to escape the 'scene' like Wilco is. I guess a lot of people don't like to listen to new music once they've gotten to a certain point in life (and the plague of classic rock and oldies stations seems to back that up) and try to hold on to the same old thing to try to prolong or relive their youth, I don't know, but that's one of the saddest fucking things I can think of: the point when you stop living, learning and exploring and start just existing.

ryanking
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Postby ryanking » Fri Dec 13, 2002 10:24 am

really good points Clem.

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words

Postby Jiggle Billy » Fri Dec 13, 2002 1:58 pm

tastes are constantly changing. it is my belief that more often than not, people don't even realize their tastes changing. it's just kind of strange for others, who become so insulted, it becomes a sort of betrayal. fans are fans, though, and they almost become spouses. there are a lot of shitty spouses out there, and divorces come rough.

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Postby jaimoe0 » Sat Dec 14, 2002 1:43 am

I'm still of the mind that this issue isn't an either/or proposition. I mean, I really love A.M., but if I'm listening to Wilco it's usually either YHF or one of their recent shows. I still go back to A.M., but I'm certainly more than open to hearing what Loose Fur is all about. Doesn't mean I'll love it, but I want to be challenged.

I think we also need to bear in mind that the people who felt that the 1st Loose Fur show was lacking have stated up front that they didn't go in expecting Wilco retreads, but at the same time, they don't feel compelled to like what they heard simply because it's a "new direction." That seems fair to me.

Guest

Postby Guest » Mon Dec 16, 2002 5:14 am

I agree - so over to you sumpin - what's your take?

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Postby Jake » Mon Dec 16, 2002 9:30 am

A doctor friend of mine and I were talking about this stuff, and he says he doesn't understand what the fuck people mean by "challenging" music. "What's the challenge?" he asked. "Either you like it or you don't. It's just listening to music...it's not like climbing Mt. Everest." I think it's easy to say what "challenging" music is not: accessible, poppy, hook-laden, etc. But what the fuck do we mean by "challenging"? And why do we enjoy listening to it?

By the way, to me this issue immediately calls to mind Faulkner's Sound and the Fury, which was the hardest book to understand that I've ever read, but by the time I finished it, it was the greatest book of all time. But that's another conversation...

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Postby D. Phillips » Mon Dec 16, 2002 11:09 am

By the way, to me this issue immediately calls to mind Faulkner's Sound and the Fury, which was the hardest book to understand that I've ever read, but by the time I finished it, it was the greatest book of all time. But that's another conversation...


No, actually, I think that's a good analogy. In fact, I think that wraps it up.

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Postby poopypoopoop » Mon Dec 16, 2002 3:57 pm

Phil,
Not so fast, clever wordsmith. That analogy, perhaps, more aptly describes playing music. Listening to music is beautiful in that, much like a virus, it is eloquently simple. Different collections of sounds make people dance, cry, laugh or riot (without thinking). Most of my responses to the music that I love have been quite visceral. I really have nothing to do with what or why certain music gives me goose bumps. Sitting and actually trying to figure out why you like something, or how someone put together different sounds is just listening in a different way. I still would not consider this challenging. Not everyone likes the same music. And again, like a virus, people respond differently to different music. My way of listening to music may be dramatically different from yours. That’s okay. As I said before, I am not starting an army. I would still be interested in hearing your explanation. If after hearing it I no longer consider it to be over-the-top froo-frooeyness then I will tell you. I am honest like that (to a certain extent).

Guest

Postby Guest » Mon Dec 16, 2002 4:05 pm

Did you tell you friend to stick to doctoring so he doesn't sound like a dipshit?


Jake wrote:A doctor friend of mine and I were talking about this stuff, and he says he doesn't understand what the fuck people mean by "challenging" music. "What's the challenge?" he asked. "

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Postby D. Phillips » Mon Dec 16, 2002 4:47 pm

Dr. Poop Poop,
What I am saying as it relates to Jake's post is that sometimes you encounter music that is not immediately appealing and yet is can still be enjoyable once you've acquired an appreciation--in fact, even more enjoyable than that which immediately tickles the proverbial fancy.

Case in point, I have a friend who is always sending me CDs of his banjo playing and hollering, which at first was not my cup of tea. Upon further listening, I discovered that his appreciation of a mostly forgotten (O' Brother neophytes not withstanding) music and his enthusiasm as it came through his warble touched me in a way I was not anticipating. I found myself listening to his CDs on the way home from work or when I was getting gussied up for a night on the town because it put me in a better mood. Now, I can assure you it was a challenge to listen to these CDs at first but I am now a better person for having done so.

And I rest...


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