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Peyote Won't Rot Your Brain

Posted: Sun Nov 06, 2005 3:58 am
by Jake
Peyote Won't Rot Your Brain. Unlike some other drugs, the favorite hallucinogen of Native Americans and adventurous city folk doesn't appear to cause long-term cognitive damage. It might even be good for you. By Randy Dotinga.

Posted: Sun Nov 06, 2005 4:19 am
by Tom4
Native Americans use it as a sort of cure-all...I've never taken it (if anyone has, I'd like to hear what it's like), but supposedly you go through this period of absolute wretchedness where you feel that death is at the door and you can't stop vomiting and whatnot. They believed this was the expunging of whatever illness or problem you were taking the peyote for. I've heard testimonials (from Native Americans and non-Native Americans who wanted to try holistic medicine) that it absolutely works. Who knows?

Posted: Sun Nov 06, 2005 6:44 pm
by hebrew hammer
Where the hell can you get a hold of some peyote?

Posted: Sun Nov 06, 2005 11:43 pm
by ryanking
you can get some if you go to Boquillas Del Carmen, Mexico, right across the border from Big Bend National Park. It's a rowboat crossing from the park land into the village, the Border Patrol station is on the highway out of the park. The legend goes that if the yellow lights are flashing on the sign 1/2 mile before the Border Patrol station, that means the station is occupied, and you better throw out everything you've got in your car.

I've also been told that the flowers of the cactus are where it's really at, but the cactus that the villager produced didn't have any flowers on it. I said, "hey man, where are the flowers?" and he insisted that all peyote looks like that and that it was fine. I figured, what did I know?

Didn't know what to do with it, though, and ended up tossing it. I bet those Border Patrol guys wait by that sign and collect everything those people throw out.

Posted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 1:12 am
by miss carol
In related news, 83 kilograms of pot needed for religious rite, charged native says

Guess, peyote alone didn't cut the muster.

Posted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 11:36 am
by Barabajagal
First: it's still legal?!

Second: I can't imagine why any person would want to use it "long-term," but maybe that's just me.

Posted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 1:31 pm
by Little Timmy
Barabajagal wrote:I can't imagine why any person would want to use it "long-term," but maybe that's just me.


I believe that, in our culture, there would be a certain stigma attached to staggering around, vomiting from all pores and speaking in tongues to one's ancestors. Not that it ever bothered those Yananamos in the Amazon. Remember those cats from the anthropology film back in high school? Taking turns blasting some hallucinogenic ground-up tree bark stuff up each others' noses with a bamboo blow-gun -- now, that's the way to par-teee!

Posted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 3:45 pm
by trainwreck2
I think the supreme court keeps striking down laws allowing religious use of drugs, which is pretty much unconstitutional...so its probably not legal even for religious rites...
as far as crackers go its certainly not legal...

Barabajagal wrote:First: it's still legal?!

Second: I can't imagine why any person would want to use it "long-term," but maybe that's just me.

Posted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 3:48 pm
by Tom4
It is legal on Native American reservation grounds deemed appropriate by our government.

Posted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 4:13 pm
by miss carol
Tom4 wrote:It is legal on Native American reservation grounds deemed appropriate by our government.


Here's a question that I'm too lazy to search for: Is there a US federal department dedicated to Indian affairs? Also, is there a distinction between reservation and non-reservation Indians? In Canada there is such a ministry and there is a distinction made for "status" and "non-status" Indians (or First Nations peoples). The rationale has quite ugly foundations.

I'm more curious than anything. I took a Native History course way back in university and was quite appalled at the treatment of First Nations (by govt, church, traders, etc). Did you know that Canadian reservations were the model for South African bantusans? Yep. Quite the eagle feather in the old RCMP hat, there, I'd say.