Where the Wild Things Are

This is the place where you can vent whatever's on your mind. Feel free to go off on extended rants or brief blurbs about whatever's rocking your world.

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Sugarcubes Forever
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Postby Sugarcubes Forever » Fri Mar 27, 2009 2:41 pm

Jake wrote:Great interview! I love that Spike did it as "natural" as possible. All shot on location, no green screen! Dudes in huge suits!


Aduts in monster costumes....now that's scary. Almost as bad as clowns.

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Postby Jake » Wed Aug 26, 2009 2:40 pm

Max at Sea by Dave Eggers, an excerpt of Eggers' novelization of the movie.

russ
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Postby russ » Sat Aug 29, 2009 10:13 pm

The movie is going to be AWE-SOME.

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Postby quasarwutwut » Mon Aug 31, 2009 7:07 pm

Totally disagree.

No wait, I did that wrong. I totally agree.

Sugarcubes Forever
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Postby Sugarcubes Forever » Thu Oct 15, 2009 12:53 pm

Who's seen the movie? Thoughts?

Here are comments from aintitcool.com

The film is a two hour metaphor for a 9 year old boy working out his shit.


The review goes on to skewer the film but at the same time praise it. I recently saw a brief interview segment with Sendak. His perspective on childhood is refreshing. Namely that he doesn't feel that kids should be shielded, coddled or treated like children, but that they should be treated as people, as individuals and as beings that are cabable of thought and reason. His perspective is that childhood is bunk.

From the reviews I've read Spike Jonez seems to have channeled the author intensely. But that may not be what a generation worth of nestalgic middle aged parents want to see.

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Postby Jake » Thu Oct 15, 2009 1:15 pm

The crazy thing about Sendak -- that I've only realized since having a kid of my own -- is that he doesn't care about parents' feelings at all. His characters are fully allowed to be naughty. You can totally tell he never had kids. He writes from the perspective of a kid, and that's why his books are awesome. (Then again, to be perfectly honest, I don't want my 2 1/2 year old looking up to any of those bratty protagonists as role models!).

Looking forward to the movie. Not bringing my kid though.

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Postby Sugarcubes Forever » Thu Oct 15, 2009 1:55 pm

Jake wrote:The crazy thing about Sendak -- that I've only realized since having a kid of my own -- is that he doesn't care about parents' feelings at all. His characters are fully allowed to be naughty. You can totally tell he never had kids. He writes from the perspective of a kid, and that's why his books are awesome. (Then again, to be perfectly honest, I don't want my 2 1/2 year old looking up to any of those bratty protagonists as role models!).

Looking forward to the movie. Not bringing my kid though.


Jake, I dont' know why, but it seems like people radically modify their memory of their own childhood once they have kids. I've seen it with some of my friends, siblings and people I work with. They'll speak of or act toward their children as they were never children themselves.

At the worst it manifests itself in a sort of cluelessness, like a parent who ignores the bloodshot eyes and spaced-out attitude of their stoned teenager. Or at best they simply cannot relate to their children.

Seems nuts to me. Every time I see some dorky kid that looks awkward and uncomfortable I think "childhood sucks!" and I pity that poor little kid and all the crap he'll go through before he's done.

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Postby Jake » Thu Oct 15, 2009 2:35 pm

Sugarcubes Forever wrote:Jake, I dont' know why, but it seems like people radically modify their memory of their own childhood once they have kids.

Totally. I'm trying hard to remember what it was really like. And having a kid lets me re-live a lot of those experiences/emotions. Like I can totally remember how it feels to be told to go to bed when you're right in the middle of playing. It fucking sucks. But kids need sleep and they're not smart enough yet to realize the obvious signs of exhaustion, etc. I still feel bad for him when he flips out at bedtime. Especially when he loses his shit and starts crying hysterically -- sometimes so hard he chokes (a feeling I also clearly remember).

The fundamental crux of parenting (as far as I've seen so far) is figuring out the balance between #1: not wanting to see your kid hurt, and #2: wanting your kid to grow up to be a decent human being. Those two things are often at odds. You're inclined to protect/shelter/spoil your kid but you don't want them to be sheltered/spoiled kids. At least that's been my experience for that past couple of years.

Now's as good a time as any to encourage people to listen to this:

The Sinatras - "Shuteye" (available now from iTunes, emusic, Amazon)

That baby's gonna be the death of me
Though I really love her
Gonna go get a vasectemy
Cause I never ever want another

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Postby worpswede » Thu Oct 15, 2009 11:01 pm

This movie is on my to do list this weekend. And yeah, I'm not taking the kid either. It'd freak his shit.
But interesting points. I was totally one of those kids left to his own accord and not a lot of coddling took place at my place. In fact, I remember my parents taking me to such children's fare like Blacula and The Incredible 2 Headed Transplant (at a drive in, no less).
I really believe that if someone is going to try to "break the cycle" and try to become better parents than their own, there are some things they have to seriously examine. For me, it's making sure the kids don't see movies with big furry monsters until they're old enough and restricting the amount of Bruce Dern movies they see before the age of 18.

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Postby miss carol » Fri Oct 16, 2009 1:21 pm

I'm of the school that if it can happen to a child, they should be able to read about it using age-appropriate language. Certainly, some kids are more sensitive than others (hell, horror movies still give me bad dreams!) but war, deprivation, and insecurity are suitable topics for kids lit when properly handled. Bubble wrap is for furniture.


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